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Database Provider

Author

The World Resources Institute

Grades

6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th

Subjects

Science, Social Studies, Earth and Space Sciences

Resource Type

  • Videos, 2 minutes, 32 seconds, CC, Subtitles

Regional Focus

Global

Format

YouTube Video

Frontiers in Forest Monitoring: Introduction to Satellite Monitoring

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Synopsis
  • This video explains the basics of Global Forest Watch, a nonprofit organization that uses satellites and automatic data processing to identify areas of deforestation in real-time. 

Teaching Tips

Positives

  • Students will enjoy the beautiful animations throughout the video.
  • The video highlights the contributions of the World Resources Institute in monitoring the world's forests.
  • Students will learn how satellite technology can be used to remote sense the rate of deforestation globally and collect real-time data to protect forests on a global scale.

Additional Prerequisites

  • Many students will be shocked at the statistic that "the world's forests are being destroyed at a rate of fifty soccer fields per minute." Feelings of sadness, anger, frustration, or shock are normal and natural.

Differentiation

  • After students view the video and understand the rate of global deforestation, they can use the information to propose urgent local actions on forest protection and tree planting.
  • Students could download the Forest Watcher app and work in groups to collect data on local forests.
Scientist Notes

The video highlights the contributions of the World Resources Institute in monitoring the world's forests. Using satellite technology to remote sense the rate of deforestation globally and collect real-time data is a good innovation. This video is recommended for educators to teach students to understand the rate of deforestation globally and to take urgent local actions on forest protection and natural resource and biodiversity conservation.

Standards
  • Science
    • ESS3: Earth and Human Activity
      • MS-ESS3-3. Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.
      • HS-ESS3-4. Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural systems.
    • LS2: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics Within Ecosystems
      • MS-LS2-1. Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.
      • HS-LS2-6. Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.
  • Social Studies
    • Economics
      • SS.Econ1.a.m Predict the opportunity costs of various decisions and explain why the opportunity cost might differ from person to person or in different situations. Assess how limited resources (e.g., money, land, natural resources, workers, time) impact the choices of individuals, households, communities, businesses, and countries.
    • Geography
      • SS.Geog1.a.m Use paper and digital maps to ask and answer geographic questions (e.g., Where are there patterns? Why there? So what?). Analyze how various map projections distort shape, area, distance, and direction (e.g., Mercator, Robinson, Peters).
      • SS.Geog1.a.h Use printed and digital maps to ask and answer geographic questions (e.g., Where are there patterns? Why there? So what?) and evaluate the appropriateness of geographic data and representations to understand real-world problems. Explain how current geospatial technologies (e.g., Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global Positioning Systems (GPS), satellite images, remote sensing) are used for personal, business, and government purposes.
      • SS.Geog3.a.h Evaluate, in both current and historical contexts, how the prospect of gaining access to resources in contested zones creates competition among countries. Assess how and why consumption of resources (e.g., petroleum, coal, electricity, steel, water, food) differs between developed and developing countries now and in the past.
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