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Database Provider

Author

ClimateScience

Grades

3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th

Subjects

Science, English Language Arts

Resource Type

  • Activity - Classroom

Regional Focus

Global

Format

PDF

Write Your Own Children's Book

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Synopsis
  • This resource includes brief instructions on how to lead students in writing their own children's book about an environmental issue.

Teaching Tips

Positives

  • Student creativity can flourish as they explore environmental problems and solutions through their writing.
  • Free and engaging examples of children's books are provided on ClimateScience's website (linked in the teacher's guide).
  • Students can not only learn writing and narrative techniques modeled in the books, but they can also learn more about various environmental issues by reviewing the examples.

Additional Prerequisites

  • This activity is intended to last 90 minutes.
  • If possible, teachers may want to provide some printed children's books from the library so students can look at these examples in addition to viewing the linked ones on a screen.

Differentiation

  • Teachers can help students brainstorm ideas to ensure a wide variety of topics are covered.
  • Students can work in groups and assign roles such as illustrator, writer, researcher, and editor.
  • Teachers can create a rubric or checklist to assist students in meeting expectations for the assignment.
  • If students enjoy this activity, check out the lesson Sharing Your Climate Story.
Scientist Notes
This resource challenges students to explain climate change in a fashion that is understandable to their peers. The example books provided are well-written and factual, as are the sources provided - particularly the source from NASA. This activity is recommended for teaching.
Standards
  • English Language Arts
    • Writing (K-12)
      • W.3.2 Write text in a variety of modes: a) Opinion pieces in which the student supports a point of view about a topic or text they are writing about, states an opinion, and lists reasons that support the opinion; b) Informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic and use facts, definitions, and details to develop points; c) Convey events, real or imagined, through narrative/short stories to develop experiences or events using descriptive details and clear event sequences to establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters. Use dialogue and description of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
      • W.4.2 Write text in a variety of modes: a) Opinion pieces in which the student introduces the topic or text they are writing about, states an opinion, and creates an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer's purpose. List reasons that support the opinion; b) Informative texts in which they clearly introduce a topic, group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aid comprehension. Use facts, definitions, and details to develop points; c) Convey events, real or imagined, through narrative/short stories which orient a reader by establishing a real or imagined situation and introducing a narrator and characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
      • W.5.2 Write text in a variety of modes: a) Opinion pieces that support a point of view about a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically ordered to support facts, details, and the writer's purpose; b) Informative text that introduces a topic clearly, use topic- and genre-specific language to provide a general observation, focus, and group related information logically. Include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension and to link ideas within and across categories of information; c) Convey events, real or imagined, through narrative/short stories which orient a reader by establishing a real or imagined situation and introduce a narrator and characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
      • W.6.2 Write text in a variety of modes: a) Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons, relevant evidence, and literary theory; b) Write informative texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content; c) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective narrative techniques, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
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